Boy survives fall, called a miracle - Philadelphia News, Weather and Sports from WTXF FOX 29

Boy survives fall, called a miracle

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Taye is being called a miracle. (Credit: WJBK | myFOX Detroit) Taye is being called a miracle. (Credit: WJBK | myFOX Detroit)

Taye's family tree stretches from the Horn of Africa to Oxford, Michigan. He started life in an Ethiopian orphanage, just like his older brother. Ben and Joanna McKinney adopted Taye in April.

"He was six and half months when we brought him home," said Joanna McKinney.

It was a homecoming tainted by a tragedy. Only days after arriving at his new home, a seemingly harmless fall would turn life threatening. Taye was on the bed. Ben turned his back for a second.

"He kind of pivoted and rolled off the bed, and when I turned around, he was kind of mid-air. He hadn't hit the ground yet, but he fell just straight back onto a carpeted floor," said Ben McKinney.

"Ben had called me and he was a little nervous in his voice, and he said, 'Taye fell.' And I was like, 'That's okay, you know, kids fall,'" Joanna McKinney said.

However, this fall had dire consequences. The McKinneys are speechless when a CAT scan shows massive bleeding on Taye's brain.

"I thought this child is in trouble," said neurosurgeon Dr. Karol Zakalik.

The baby is flown from Troy Beaumont to Royal Oak where Dr. Zakalik is waiting to remove part of his skull and alleviate the pressure on the brain. He is painfully honest with the McKinneys.

"I prepared them for the worst that the child may have severe brain damage. It's not clear if he will be able to... walk around... He's likely to be paralyzed and have... problems, but we may not even be able to save his life," Zakalik said.

"I would say those were the hardest hours because we... showed up and we were met by a chaplain and a doctor. That's not a good sign," said Joanna McKinney.

However, as moments turn into hours and hours into days something happens in the intensive care unit.

"It was like watching this miracle unfold every single day, " Joanna McKinney said.

"Then the next morning, I noticed he was able to move his right side. Weaker but he was able to move, and usually with a child, if you notice that they move... today, it's likely that they'll improve with time," said Zakalik.

Now, ten months and a countless of hours of therapy later, Taye's progress is amazing.

"For him to be able to clap and play and interact... if you look at him, you wouldn't ever even know there was ever a brain injury. So, that's pretty remarkable," said Megan Meloche, O.T. with Beaumont Hospital.

"Miracle child," Zakalik said.

"There's this African saying, it takes a village to raise a child, and that speaks to me so much because we lived that," said Joanna McKinney.

Some of the equipment Beaumont uses for helping young patients, such as Taye, is provided by Children's Miracle Network. For the first time, FOX 2 is partnering with CMN, Beaumont Hospital and Gardner-White Furniture to help give miracles to metro Detroit kids who need it most. Click here to find out more about how you can make a difference.

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