Robotic surgery could treat sleep apnea - Philadelphia News, Weather and Sports from WTXF FOX 29

Robotic surgery could treat sleep apnea

Posted: Updated:
NEW YORK (MYFOXNY) -

Robotic surgery might provide help for some of the 18-million Americans suffering from sleep apnea.

People with sleep apnea can stop breathing more than 30 times an hour and those pauses in breathing can last up to 20 seconds at a time.

It is dangerous if left untreated.

Mount Sinai is using robotic sleep apnea surgery in an effort to seek out a permanent solution instead of being hooked up to machines during sleep.

Mount Sinai is one of only a few programs in the country to use transoral robotic surgery to remove excess tissue or fix collapsed airways that causes sleep apnea.

The procedure, in its simplest terms, gives doctors the ability to reach parts of the throat that they couldn't without the robotic arms.

It's all done through the mouth and doctors control the robotic arm using a 3D monitor.

The robotic surgery removes tissue that causes airway blockage with no external incisions.

The results of the surgery can take several months.

But, not everyone is so convinced about the new surgery.

Dr. Carol Ash of the Health Sleep Center says, "The problem is whenever you have a new technology like robotics it creates a lot of enthusiasm and the public will want to race to what is that new cutting edge technology."

She says patients should explore all treatment options and consider the risks before getting robotic surgery.

"You can have worsening of your respiratory status after the surgery, certainly there is bleeding, one thing that is very common with the surgery is pain," says Dr. Carol.

http://icahn.mssm.edu/about-us/news-and-events/mount-sinai-brings-benefit-of-robotic-surgery-to-sleep-apnea-sufferers

  • HealthMore>>

  • A little wine might help kidneys stay healthy

    A little wine might help kidneys stay healthy

    An occasional glass of wine might help keep your kidneys healthy, new research suggests.
    An occasional glass of wine might help keep your kidneys healthy, new research suggests.
  • People seek out health info when famous person dies

    People seek out health info when famous person dies

    WEDNESDAY, April 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The deaths of well-known people offer an opportunity to educate the general public about disease detection and prevention, a new study suggests. Researchers surveyed 1,400 American men and women after Apple co-founder Steve Jobs died of pancreatic cancer in 2011 and learned that more than one-third of them sought information about his cause of death or information about cancer in general soon after his death was reported. About 7 percent of th...
    WEDNESDAY, April 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The deaths of well-known people offer an opportunity to educate the general public about disease detection and prevention, a new study suggests. Researchers surveyed 1,400 American men and women after Apple co-founder Steve Jobs died of pancreatic cancer in 2011 and learned that more than one-third of them sought information about his cause of death or information about cancer in general soon after his death was reported. About 7 percent of th...
  • Mental illness not a driving force behind crime

    Mental illness not a driving force behind crime

    TUESDAY, April 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Less than 10 percent of crimes committed by mentally ill people are directly linked to the symptoms of their disorders, a new study shows. "When we hear about crimes committed by people with mental illness, they tend to be big headline-making crimes, so they get stuck in people's heads," said study author Jillian Peterson, a psychology professor at Normandale Community College in Bloomington, Minn. "The vast majority of people with mental illness a...
    TUESDAY, April 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Less than 10 percent of crimes committed by mentally ill people are directly linked to the symptoms of their disorders, a new study shows. "When we hear about crimes committed by people with mental illness, they tend to be big headline-making crimes, so they get stuck in people's heads," said study author Jillian Peterson, a psychology professor at Normandale Community College in Bloomington, Minn. "The vast majority of people with mental illness a...
Powered by WorldNow

WTXF-TV
330 Market Street
Philadelphia, PA 19106-2796

Phone: (215) 925-2929
Fax: (215) 982-5494

Didn't find what you were looking for?
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Fox Television Stations, Inc. and Worldnow. All Rights Reserved.
Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Ad Choices