Urban Outfitters controversial shot glasses - Philadelphia News, Weather and Sports from WTXF FOX 29

Urban Outfitters controversial shot glasses and other products

Posted: Updated:
NEW YORK (MYFOXNY) -

Urban Outfitters sells a syringe shot shooter, a can cooler, a beer cozy that looks like a prescription bottle. I found them online and inside several urban outfitters stores in Manhattan. I even saw some kids checking them out.

This is why some people are upset with the Philadelphia-based company that caters to the hipster generation, and a younger crowd, with its edgy clothing and kitschy products.

"You have to have a sense of humor but I think that this goes one step beyond what it should," said Susan Ohanesian, the chief clinical officer of Daytop Village, a recovery center in Manhattan that helps many adolescents with drug and alcohol problems. "It's just not the message to be giving young kids when we have the prescription drug problem that we have today."

That spurred Rep. Hal Rodgers of Kentucky to send a letter to the CEO of Urban Outfitters, Richard Hayne, calling for these latest products to be removed from the store shelves. The letter reads in part, "For a company with sales of $2.79 billion in 2012 to trivialize the pain and suffering of those struggling with addiction is tasteless at best but irresponsible at worst."

This isn't the first time Urban Outfitters has taken heat for its products. In 2003 the company released a Monopoly parody called "Ghettopoly" and in 2006 it sold Christmas ornaments shaped as handguns.

We reached out to urban outfitters. So far, we haven't heard back. But we'll keep trying.

  • Your MoneyMore>>

  • Grocery-store etiquette

    Grocery-store etiquette

    Friday, April 18 2014 7:24 PM EDT2014-04-18 23:24:07 GMT
    Whether barricading shopping aisles with abandoned carts, massaging every piece of fruit in the building, or blankly staring at a shelf of items so no one else can pick one, grocery store pests can turn a quick trip to restock your fridge into a nightmare.
    Whether barricading shopping aisles with abandoned carts, massaging every piece of fruit in the building, or blankly staring at a shelf of items so no one else can pick one, grocery store pests can turn a quick trip to restock your fridge into a nightmare. In the hope of gently educating those unclear on grocery-shopping etiquette, we asked you to help us put together a list of what not to do.
  • Expert: credit cards are not fully secure

    Expert: credit cards are not fully secure

    Friday, April 18 2014 6:49 PM EDT2014-04-18 22:49:51 GMT
    Another week and another credit card hacking at a major retailer. This time it was Michael's craft store. Consumers are uneasy because current credit card technology is antiquated. "The fact is you cannot protect your credit cards, you can't every time you give it out it is vulnerable to fraud," says Robert Siciliano, McAfee identity theft expert.
    Another week and another credit card hacking at a major retailer. This time it was Michael's craft store. Consumers are uneasy because current credit card technology is antiquated. "The fact is you cannot protect your credit cards, you can't every time you give it out it is vulnerable to fraud," says Robert Siciliano, McAfee identity theft expert.
  • Basil farm ready to switch to marijuana

    Basil farm ready to switch to marijuana

    Friday, April 18 2014 4:11 PM EDT2014-04-18 20:11:50 GMT
    Basil plants grow on a New Jersey farm, but the facility could be turned into a five-acre medical marijuana greenhouse with only 48 hours' notice. The hoses from the state-of-the-art Dutch hydroponic system are watering flowers now, but with a few minor adjustments could just as easily grow marijuana plants for medicinal cannabis. The only reason it's not happening now is because the company is publicly traded and subject to federal law.
    Basil plants grow on a New Jersey farm, but the facility could be turned into a five-acre medical marijuana greenhouse with only 48 hours' notice. The hoses from the state-of-the-art Dutch hydroponic system are watering flowers now, but with a few minor adjustments could just as easily grow marijuana plants for medicinal cannabis. The only reason it's not happening now is because the company is publicly traded and subject to federal law.
Powered by WorldNow

WTXF-TV
330 Market Street
Philadelphia, PA 19106-2796

Phone: (215) 925-2929
Fax: (215) 982-5494

Didn't find what you were looking for?
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Fox Television Stations, Inc. and Worldnow. All Rights Reserved.
Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Ad Choices