Wedding gift etiquette - Philadelphia News, Weather and Sports from WTXF FOX 29

Wedding gift etiquette

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At a wedding, an unappreciated gift seems a little like an over-served relative: they're going to turn up. You just have to decide how you're going to deal with them.

A food basket given at a recent wedding in Ontario, Canada, led the bride to send the gift-giver a nasty text message.

"Appalling. Unacceptable," said Jeannie Uyanik, the founder of Cap and Gown Weddings. "It's just not appropriate to berate a guest for a gift."

Among her many duties, Uyanik coaches brides and grooms on their registries.

"You want to consider giving something that means a lot and maybe hurts a little," Uyanik said. Gifts vary depending on how well you know the marrying party and your financial means, she said. But no matter how royally they may dislike it, the receivers must act graciously.

The saying goes: Never look a gift horse in the mouth. But when it comes to weddings, it seems it's OK to look. Just don't let anyone see you.

"The really worst possible type of gift is the gift that's been re-gifted and the couple can tell," Uyanik said.

For givers, your attendance or distance of travel shouldn't affect the quality of the gift you give.

And for receivers don't expect anything, no matter how good or bad the gift may be.

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