$2,000 for overnight camping in Manhattan - FOX 29 News Philadelphia | WTXF-TV

$2,000 for overnight camping in Manhattan

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NEW YORK (MYFOXNY) -

Keep the booze and romance of a Manhattan hotel stay and add marshmallow and a tent.

It called Glamping and it's taking New York by storm.

But ditch all the fumbling with wet matches, the pairing of tent poles with canvas loops, and the laying of your head on hard earth.

"Where else can you have a wonderful bed, outdoor fireplace, Moet champagne?" asks Jeffrey Poirot, the general manager at AKA Central Park.

AKA Central Park's glamping experience goes for $2,000 a night. It includes an overnight stay on the 1,000-square-foot balcony on the 17th-floor of a Midtown building.

Believe it or not, but there is competition.

The Affinia Gardens hotel on the Upper East Side also offers a glamping experience at the "cut-rate" price of $309 a night. People pay for a room with a patio and the staff provides a tent.

Kathleen Boyle of Queens booked a glamping experience at the Affinia Gardens to celebrate her anniversary.

"Knowing I have the safety of being able to go back inside, not having to pee in the woods, there's a nice bathroom, that was excellent," Boyle says.

And that's the real appeal: You aren't stuck in the middle of nowhere in the rain with fraying nerves, charred burgers and poison ivy. You can sleep outside but escape to world-class restaurants and a roof over your head whenever you please.

Tom Dokton has ponied up the money to stay at AKA Central Park.

"The access to the city, being the middle of the city, and having this kind of atmosphere is fantastic," Dokton says. "It really is, you're staying outside overnight, outdoors, it's nice."

The Hyatt on 48th and Lexington also offers  glamping experiences. No understanding of knots, bug-spray, Gore-Tex or a first-aid kit required.

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