Kmart Joe Boxer ad controversy - Philadelphia News, Weather and Sports from WTXF FOX 29

Kmart Joe Boxer ad controversy

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Kmart opens its latest holiday-themed ad innocently enough. But that buttoned-up above-the-table business soon yields to a racier below-the-belt party.

Interpret those motions however you please, but it certainly seems to us that Kmart is insinuating the tolling of those bells comes from somewhere underneath each male-model's pair of Joe Boxers.

"Sex sells, but sex can also make people throw up," said T.J. Walker, a media expert. "Sex can make people say: 'This is kind of a sleazy organization. We're not sure we want to do business with them.'"

Walker sees this less about sex (Victoria's Secret already owns that corner of the marketplace) and more about breaking from tradition.

"There does seem to be a lot of people who are attacking the traditions of wholesomeness of Christmas whether it's Walmart attacking Thanksgiving dinner or Kmart turning this into a Chippendale celebration," Walker said.

If you thought I was going to be shaking out those noises with my body, you need to get your mind out of the gutter. Forget what Kmart was thinking making the ad; we wanted to know if the consumer liked it.

If Kmart risked public favor with its so-called Show Your Joe commercial that gamble paid off among shoppers we found, who laughed about it.

"You can definitely get the feeling of Christmas," one said.

We'll just have to wait and see if that Christmas feeling equates to holiday sales.

"I wish I had someone to give it to," a shopper said. "You have to be careful who you give it to."

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