Deadly Metro-North train derailment - FOX 29 News Philadelphia | WTXF-TV

Deadly Metro-North train derailment

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Photo credit:  Daniel Cohen @danielcohen Photo credit: Daniel Cohen @danielcohen
Photo credit:  Daniel Cohen @danielcohen Photo credit: Daniel Cohen @danielcohen
NEW YORK (MYFOXNY) -

The National Transportation Safety Board's investigation into a deadly Metro-North train derailment in the Bronx has revealed that the train was traveling at 82 mph through a 70 mph zone and then a 30 mph zone at a curve when it derailed early Sunday morning, killing four people and injuring more than 60 others.

CLICK HERE FOR UPDATE: NTSB: Metro-North train going too fast at curve

The victims who died were identified as Donna L. Smith, 54, of Newburgh, N.Y., James G. Lovell, 58, of Cold Spring, N.Y., James M. Ferrari, 59, of Montrose, N.Y. and Ahn Kisook, 35, of Queens.

The MTA issued a statement saying, "The MTA extends its deepest sympathies to the families of the victims. The MTA is fully cooperating with the investigation being conducted by the National Transportation Safety Board."

NewYork-Presbyterian says it received a total of 18 patients due to the train derailment. The four patients received at NewYork-Presbyterian/The Allen Hospital were been evaluated, treated and released. NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia received 14 patients of which seven have been evaluated, treated and released and seven were admitted for further treatment. Two of the seven patients admitted remain in critical condition.

Federal authorities have completed righting toppled rail cars on Monday as they continue to investigate.

The derailment happened as the train took the big curve near the Spuyten Duyvil station at the point where the Harlem and Hudson Rivers come together. All seven of the cars on the train, and the engine came off of the tracks. Several cars turned over and one landed just feet from the waters of the Harlem River.

The force of the crash smashed windows out of the train and sent at least two passengers flying out of the train.

The engineer claims to have slammed on the brakes, but said they did not work.

Speaking with Fox 5's Good Day New York, Gov. Andrew Cuomo said there are three possibilities into the cause of the derailment: problem with the track; equipment failure or operator error.

"I don't have any doubt the train was going too fast. The speed limit a little further north is about 70 miles and the trains are supposed to slow down at 30 miles per hour at the turns," Cuomo said. "The trains have a block box like an airplane that will say how fast the train was going and when the brakes were applied if they were applied."

The NTSB collected two data recorders from the train.

Later, after the NTSB released its initial findings, the Cuomo administration said it would continue to help with the board's investigation.

"NTSB's finding that the train was traveling more than double the set speed limit makes clear that, as we suspected, extreme speed was a central cause of this crash," Cuomo said in a statement. "The lives that were lost yesterday are a stark reminder that protecting the safety of all New Yorkers must be our top priority. When the investigation concludes, we will make sure that any responsible parties are held accountable. My thoughts and prayers continue to be with the families of the victims of yesterday's crash."


The Metro-North train from Poughkeepsie was headed to Grand Central Terminal. About 120 people were on board the half full train. The engine was pushing the train cars from behind.

Cranes were sent to pick up cars that are were their sides to make sure there weren't more fatalities.

Amtrak Empire Line Service between New York City and Albany was suspended after the crash but was restored Sunday afternoon.

Officials warned the 26,000 weekday riders on the affected line of the nation's second-biggest commuter railroad to brace for crowded trains during the morning commute; shuttle buses were being provided.

"We'd like to get service up toward the end of the week," Gov. Cuomo said.

The NTSB says its investigators will be on scene from 7 to 10 days, but has released the tracks back to Metro-North.

Click for updates.

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