Join a choir, sing your way to happiness? - Philadelphia News, Weather and Sports from WTXF FOX 29

Join a choir, sing your way to happiness?

Updated:
© iStockphoto.com / nautilus shell studios © iStockphoto.com / nautilus shell studios
  • HealthMore>>

  • Kids' genetic risk for obesity rises with age, study finds

    Kids' genetic risk for obesity rises with age, study finds

    As children get older, genes appear to play an increasing role in whether some kids become heavier than their peers, a new study indicates.
    As children get older, genes appear to play an increasing role in whether some kids become heavier than their peers, a new study indicates.
  • FDA to propose e-cigarette regulations

    FDA to propose e-cigarette regulations

    © FDA© FDA
    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is proposing long-awaited regulations governing the fast-growing electronic cigarette industry.
    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is proposing long-awaited regulations governing the fast-growing electronic cigarette industry.
  • Spouse's sunny outlook may be good for your health

    Spouse's sunny outlook may be good for your health

    Marriage vows often include the promise to stick together for better or for worse, and research now suggests that when it comes to your health, having an optimistic spouse is better.
    Marriage vows often include the promise to stick together for better or for worse, and research now suggests that when it comes to your health, having an optimistic spouse is better.

FRIDAY, Dec. 6, 2013 (HealthDay News) -- Singing in a choir might be good for your mental health, a new study suggests.

British researchers conducted an online survey of nearly 400 people who either sang in a choir, sang alone or belonged to a sports team. All three activities were associated with greater levels of mental well-being, but the levels were higher among those who sang in a choir than those who sang alone.

The poll also revealed that choral singers regarded their choirs as more meaningful social groups compared to how athletes viewed their sports teams.

The study, presented Thursday at a meeting of the British Psychological Society in York, England, did not actually show a cause-and-effect link between singing in a choir and being happy, however.

"Research has already suggested that joining a choir could be a cost-effective way to improve people's well-being," study author Nick Stewart, of Oxford Brookes University, said in a society news release. "Yet we know surprisingly little about how the well-being effects of choral singing are brought about."

"These findings suggest that the experience of using your voice to make music may be enhanced when you feel part of a cohesive social group," he said. "Further research could look at how moving and breathing [in concert] with others might be responsible for creating a unique well-being effect."

Research presented at meetings is typically viewed as preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

More information

Mental Health America offers tips on how to live your life well.

Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

*DISCLAIMER*: The information contained in or provided through this site section is intended for general consumer understanding and education only and is not intended to be and is not a substitute for professional advice. Use of this site section and any information contained on or provided through this site section is at your own risk and any information contained on or provided through this site section is provided on an "as is" basis without any representations or warranties.
Powered by WorldNow

WTXF-TV
330 Market Street
Philadelphia, PA 19106-2796

Phone: (215) 925-2929
Fax: (215) 982-5494

Didn't find what you were looking for?
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Fox Television Stations, Inc. and Worldnow. All Rights Reserved.
Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Ad Choices