High School, College Students Charged In Main Line Drug Bust - FOX 29 News Philadelphia | WTXF-TV

High School, College Students Charged In Main Line Drug Bust

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25-year old Neil K. Scott and 18-year old Timothy C. Brooks are accused of employing dealers who would sell marijuana, hash oil, cocaine and MDMA (a.k.a. Ecstasy). 25-year old Neil K. Scott and 18-year old Timothy C. Brooks are accused of employing dealers who would sell marijuana, hash oil, cocaine and MDMA (a.k.a. Ecstasy).
NORRISTOWN, Pa. - Montgomery County authorities announced the filing of charges and arrests Monday in connection with a drug trafficking operation focused on distributing drugs to students at five schools and three colleges on the Main Line. 

Police have arrested two men, who police say ran a drug trade along with "sub-dealers" for selling illicit substances in high schools and colleges in an alleged operation called the "Main Line Take Over Project."

District Attorney Risa Ferman said these suspects played a very dangerous game.

Investigators say during one of the raids on a suspect's home right next to the drugs they found a loaded 9-millimeter handgun and a fully loaded assault rival that was set on the fire position.

“Their intention, as the name suggests, was the two of them would take over drug distribution and in particular marijuana distribution,” Ferman said. “Their goal was actual to create a monopoly for themselves and the distribution to high school students and to college students.”

Neil K. Scott, 25, and Timothy C. Brooks, 18, are accused of employing dealers who would sell marijuana, hash oil, cocaine and Ecstasy, according to investigators.

According to prosecutors, the high school sub-dealers were encouraged to sell at least one pound of marijuana a week. If the dealers met their weekly quota, the incentives included a lower purchase price for marijuana in order to increase their profit margin.

Investigators say Brooks instructed the high school sub-dealers to make certain there was always a constant supply in the assigned schools.

They say Scott made regular trips to Gettysburg College and Lafayette College to deliver marijuana, MDMA, and cocaine to sub-dealers. Police say he would encourage them to locate new customers to offset his cost of driving to their campuses. The incentives were lower prices for drugs and the opportunity to buy them on credit.

According to authorities, during the four-month investigation, they discovered text messages between the two where Brooks says, "I'm trying to start a business and learning how to run this.” Scott replies, “Just keep finding customers and we'll both make more than enough money. We will crush it.”

Officials say drugs were distributed to students Lower Merion High School, The Haverford School, Harriton High School, Conestoga High School and Radnor High School as well as Gettysburg, Lafayette and Haverford Colleges.

11 suspects were hauled in to court Monday led by the 25-year-old Scott who dropped out of college after being sanctioned for using marijuana and creating counterfeited I.D. cards. 

Along with two juveniles, police arrested the following sub-dealers:

  • Daniel Robert McGrath, 18, Glenolden, PA
  • John Cole Roseman, 20, Lafayette College
  • Christian Stockton Euler, 23, Lafayette College
  • Garret M. Johnson, 18 Haverford College
  • Reid Cohen, 18 Haverford College
  • Willow Lynn Orr, 22, South Philadelphia
  • Domenic Vincent Curicio, 29 Manayunk
Brooks and Scott are former graduates of The Haverford School. They also played lacrosse at a Montgomery County private school and coached youth sports leagues. Ferman says the two men exploited those relationships to help build their drug operation.

All suspects involved face drug-related charges.
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